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Office of Equal Opportunity & Sexual Harassment / Title IX Compliance
Menu Office of Equal Opportunity & Sexual Harassment / Title IX Compliance
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University of California Santa Barbara
Title IX & Sexual Harassment Policy Compliance Office

Laws & Regulations

California Fair Employment and Housing Act of 1959
This law provides protection from harassment or discrimination in employment because of: age (40 and over), ancestry, color, religious creed, denial of family and medical care leave, disability (mental and physical) including HIV and AIDS, marital status, medical condition (cancer and genetic characteristics), national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII)
This law makes it illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law also requires that employers reasonably accommodate applicants' and employees' sincerely held religious practices, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer's business. The Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA)
This law makes it illegal to pay different wages to men and women if they perform equal work in the same workplace. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Title IX Education Act Amendments of 1972
This law forbids gender discrimination in education programs, including athletics that received federal dollars. The Title IX education Amendments of 1972 are administered by Department of Labor's Office of Civil Rights.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act 1978
This law amended Title VII to make it illegal to discriminate against a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

AB1825
This legislation became effective August 17, 2007, and mandates immediate and continual biennial state-wide sexual harassment prevention training for any employee who performs supervisory functions within a company of 50 employees or more, regardless of where the supervisory employees are based as long as the company has employees within the State of California. This training must be at least two hours "of classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment," including, information and practical guidance regarding federal and state statutory provisions concerning the prohibition against, and the prevention and correction of, sexual harassment, as well as, the remedies available to victims of sexual harassment in employment; all of which must specifically include practical examples aimed at instructing supervisors in the prevention of harassment, discrimination, and retaliation, and which must be presented by trainers or educators with "knowledge and expertise" in the prevention of harassment, discrimination, and retaliation.

Prohibited Employment Practices
It is illegal to discriminate against someone (applicant or employee) because of that person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to retaliate against a person because he or she complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law forbids discrimination in every aspect of employment.

The law also prohibits UC Santa Barbara from using neutral employment policies and practices that have a disproportionately negative effect on applicants or employees of a particular protected category, if the policies or practices at issue are not job-related and necessary to the operation of the business.

For more information regarding prohibited employment policies and practices, please visit the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's (EEOC) website.