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Office of Equal Opportunity & Sexual Harassment / Title IX Compliance
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University of California Santa Barbara
Equal Opportunity & Discrimination Prevention Office

Laws & Regulations

California Fair Employment and Housing Act of 1959
This law provides protection from harassment or discrimination in employment because of: age (40 and over), ancestry, color, religious creed, denial of family and medical care leave, disability (mental and physical) including HIV and AIDS, marital status, medical condition (cancer and genetic characteristics), national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII)
This law makes it illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law also requires that employers reasonably accommodate applicants' and employees' sincerely held religious practices, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer's business. The Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Executive Order 11246 of 1965 (E.O. 11246)
This order prohibits federal contractors and subcontractors and federally-assisted construction contractors and subcontractors that generally have contracts that exceed $10,000 from discriminating in employment decisions on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It also requires covered contractors to take affirmative action to ensure that equal opportunity is provided in all aspects of their employment. The E.O. 11246 is administered by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) within the U.S. Department of Labor.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA)
This law protects people who are 40 or older from discrimination because of age. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA)
This law makes it illegal to pay different wages to men and women if they perform equal work in the same workplace. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
This law makes it illegal to discriminate against a qualified person with a disability in the federal government. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law also requires that employers reasonably accommodate the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability who is an applicant or employee, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer's business. The Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 (VEVRAA)
This act requires covered federal government contractors and subcontractors to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment specified categories of veterans protected by the Act and prohibits discrimination against such veterans. In addition, VEVRAA requires contractors and subcontractors to list their employment openings with the appropriate employment service delivery system, and that covered veterans receive priority in referral to such openings. Further, VEVRAA requires federal contractors and subcontractors to compile and submit annually a report on the number of current employees who are covered veterans. The affirmative action and mandatory job-listing provisions of VEVRAA are enforced by the Employment Standards Administration's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) within the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). DOL's Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS) administers the veterans' employment reporting requirement.

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)
This law makes it illegal to discriminate against a qualified person with a disability in the private sector and in state and local governments. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law also requires that employers reasonably accommodate the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability who is an applicant or employee, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer's business. The Title I of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 is administered by Department of Labor's Office of Civil Rights.

Sections 102 and 103 of the Civil Rights Act of 1991
Among other things, this law amends Title VII and the ADA to permit jury trials and compensatory and punitive damage awards in intentional discrimination cases. Sections 102 and 103 of the Civil Rights Act of 1991 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) of 1994
Protects service members' reemployment rights when returning from a period of service in the uniformed services, including those called up from the reserves or National Guard, and prohibits employer discrimination based on military service or obligation. The U.S. Department of Labor's (DOL) Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS) administers USERRA.

Proposition 209 (Section 31, Article I of the California State Constitution) of 1996
Prohibits the state, local governments, districts, public universities, colleges, and schools, and other government instrumentalities from discriminating against or giving preferential treatment to any individual or group in public employment, public education, or public contracting on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin. Does not prohibit reasonably necessary, bona fide qualifications based on sex and actions necessary for receipt of federal funds. Mandates enforcement to extent permitted by federal law. Requires uniform remedies for violations. Provides for severability of provisions if invalid.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA)
Effective - November 21, 2009.
This law makes it illegal to discriminate against employees or applicants because of genetic information. Genetic information includes information about an individual's genetic tests and the genetic tests of an individual's family members, as well as information about any disease, disorder or condition of an individual's family members (i.e. an individual's family medical history). The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 is administered by the office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Prohibited Employment Practices
It is illegal to discriminate against someone (applicant or employee) because of that person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to retaliate against a person because he or she complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law forbids discrimination in every aspect of employment.

The law also prohibits UC Santa Barbara from using neutral employment policies and practices that have a disproportionately negative effect on applicants or employees of a particular protected category, if the policies or practices at issue are not job-related and necessary to the operation of the business.

For more information regarding prohibited employment policies and practices, please visit the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's (EEOC) website.