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Office of Equal Opportunity & Sexual Harassment / Title IX Compliance
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University of California Santa Barbara

The Office of Equal Opportunity & Sexual Harassment / Title IX Compliance (OEOSH/TC) is the campus office responsible for the University's compliance with federal and state laws and University policies and procedures regarding discrimination, retaliation and sexual harassment for students, staff and faculty. OEOSH/TC works to promote and integrate the principles of equal opportunity, affirmative action, nondiscrimination and excellence through diversity on campus.

Latest News

  • Why many rape victims don’t fight or yell

    In the midst of sexual assault, the brain’s fear circuitry dominates. The prefrontal cortex can be severely impaired, and all that’s left may be reflexes and habits. In the Washington Post’s recent series on college sexual assault, many victims describe how they reacted – and did not react – while being assaulted. Another article also published this month, in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, shows that some responses have been programmed into human brains by evolution.

  • The High Cost of Sexual Assaults on College Campuses

    It is estimated that one in five women are sexually assaulted during their years as college students. The U.S. Department of Education reported that 2013 saw over 5,000 forcible sexual offenses on universities and colleges, and a recent study provides evidence that the actual number of assaults may be six times higher.

  • Talk, Then Talk Again

    A university tapped by the White House to lead the charge on sexual assault education and prevention released a report Tuesday on how institutions can best spread awareness of their sexual assault policies and resources.

  • Is Britain's sexist streak deeper than top scientist's 'trouble with girls'?

    Professor Tim Hunt resigned today after making sexist comments about women working in the sciences. But some say his remarks are indicative of a bigger problem in the UK, most recently manifesting as boorish 'lad culture.'

  • Check out how one college is teaching students how to prevent rape: with a video game.

    A new game developed at Carnegie Mellon University aims to change the way people react when they witness sexual harassment and violence. The game is called Decisions That Matter, and it follows a group of college-age friends on the night of a party.

  • Talk, Then Talk Again

    A university tapped by the White House to lead the charge on sexual assault education and prevention released a report Tuesday on how institutions can best spread awareness of their sexual assault policies and resources.

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